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News

Are you thinking about a career in health care?

Would you like to gain valuable experience while completing your education?

If so, professional caregiving might be the job for you.

“Caregiving is the perfect job for busy students – especially those who working toward a career as a nurse, physical therapist or other health care occupations,” said Sierra Goetz, co-founder and operations manager at Tudor Oaks Home Care’s partner, the HomeCare Advocacy Network (HCAN). “At HCAN, we understand that it’s not possible for students to maintain a 9-5, Monday through Friday work schedule. We offer flexible hours so we can accommodate students’ hectic schedules, while still providing our clients with exceptional care.”

Continue reading Jump-Start Your Health Care Career

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You may have heard the heartbreaking news – actor Bruce Willis has been diagnosed with frontotemporal dementia (FTD).

“FTD is a cruel disease that many of us have never heard of and can strike anyone,” his family said in a statement sharing the diagnosis. “For people under 60, FTD is the most common form of dementia, and because getting the diagnosis can take years, FTD is likely much more prevalent than we know.”

According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, FTD is caused by a group of disorders that gradually damage the brain’s frontal lobes (the areas behind your forehead) and/or its temporal lobes (the regions behind your ears). There are three types of FTD: Continue reading What is Frontotemporal Dementia?

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News / Resources for Families

You worked hard.

You achieved your professional goals.

You saved enough money to retire early and comfortably.

You love traveling, playing golf and spending time with your family, but you’re also looking for more – maybe a meaningful encore career.

“Professional caregiving is a great option for older men and women who want more than a paycheck. The older caregivers on our team enjoy staying active and, most importantly, making an important difference in the lives of others,” said Sierra Goetz, operations manager at Tudor Oaks Home Care’s partner, the Home Care Advocacy Network. “With many years of life and work experience experience, retirees have so much to offer – that’s why they’re such great caregivers.”

Continue reading Are You Ready for an Encore Career?

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News / Resources for Families

Do you have aging loved ones who are living with diabetes?

A chronic condition, diabetes affects how the body turns food into energy. It occurs when the pancreases is no longer able to make insulin or when the body can’t make good use of the insulin it produces. Over time, diabetes can cause serious health problems, such as heart disease, kidney disease and vision loss.

According to the American Diabetes Association:

  • Approximately 37.3 million Americans (11.3%) have diabetes
  • More than 15.9 million seniors (29.2%) have diabetes
  • Nearly 1.4 million Americans are diagnosed with diabetes every year
  • Diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death in the U.S.
  • By 2050, it’s estimated that cases in older women will rise by 270% and older men by 430%

“Although there is no cure, there are things you can do to help your senior loved ones manage their diabetes and continue to live independently in their homes,” said Sierra Goetz, co-founder and operations manager at Tudor Oaks Home Care’s partner, the HomeCare Advocacy Network (HCAN). “If family members or friends aren’t available to help, you might want to consider hiring an in-home professional caregiver – someone who will consistently deliver services needed to help your loved ones stay on top of prescribed dietary, exercise and medication regimens.” Continue reading Five Ways Home Care Can Help Seniors Living with Diabetes

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The volume on your dad’s television is blaring.

When talking to your mom, she’s constantly asking you to repeat what you said.

In group settings, your parents never join the conversation.

Hearing loss is a common problem that comes with aging. According to the National Institute on Aging, nearly 25 percent of those aged 65 – 74 and 50 percent of those who are 75 and older have disabling hearing loss.

The good news – hearing aids can help most older adults hear sounds they’ve not previously heard, hear speech over the telephone more clearly, make communication with family and friends easier and improve communication in noisy listening situations, like a restaurant.

And now a new study shows hearing aids might also be an important tool in the effort to prevent cognitive decline and dementia. Continue reading Hearing Aids Can Lessen Cognitive Decline

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News / Resources for Families / Resources for Seniors

Each year, millions of older Americans fall victim to some type of financial fraud. According to a report from the Federal Trade Commission, older adults were scammed out of more than $1 billion last year – losing an average of $32,200.

“Seniors who live alone, have memory issues or don’t understand technology are especially vulnerable,” said Sierra Goetz, co-founder and operations manager at Tudor Oaks Home Care’s partner, the HomeCare Advocacy Network (HCAN). “Unfortunately, the holiday season provides many opportunities for scammers to prey on older people – turning what’s supposed to be the most joyous time of the year into a nightmare.” Continue reading Protecting Your Senior from Holiday Scams

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Have you ever considered a career in professional caregiving? “More than 10,000 people turn 65 every day – and an overwhelming majority of them want to remain in their homes as they age. That’s why home care is now one of the country’s fastest growing industries – with no end in sight,” said Teresa Steinfatt, Vice President of Business Performance at Tudor Oaks Home Care’s partner, the HomeCare Advocacy Network (HCAN).

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According to Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans, older adults should engage in 150 – 300 minutes a week of moderate-intensity exercise (walking, weight-lifting and other low-intensity activities) or 75-150 minutes a week of vigorous physical activity (jogging, running, swimming, biking and other high-intensity activities).

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Researchers analyzed data from nearly 936,000 patients age 65 and older who received a flu vaccine and an equal number of individuals who did not. They found that, over a four-year period, those who had at least one flu shot were 40 percent less likely to develop Alzheimer’s disease than those who were unvaccinated.

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